Tree Gallery

Corn, No. 2 / Georgia O'Keefe
Corn, No. 2 / Georgia O’Keefe


When the trees are barren, merely skeletons, branches shaking in the cold bitter wind the places around us appear void of color. In hopes of adding a vibrant edge to the environment whitewashed by snow and bone nursing cold, a natural gallery of sorts could be established whereby the trees will be the canvas of different artworks in history or in the present that often made anyone who saw it stop and remember the beauty that is nature.

Expert Witness Statement

“What’s the use of a fine house if you haven’t got a tolerable planet to put it on?”

-Henry David Thoreau

Subject Statement

Using colored twine, the thick stems of trees will be wound with vibrant art pieces that often led its audience to stop and gape at in awe at the wonder that is the environment. Works such as Claude Monet’s famed ‘Water Lilies’, will hug tree trunks to Georgia O’Keefe’s ‘Corn, No.2’ in a park deemed barren and void of activity in the city of Camden.

Content Statement

  1. Art is an entity that everyone ought to bear witness to; in it you find voices and understanding. A possible purpose for this artwork is to bring art physically to the people who seldom enter galleries, by physically creating one ‘a tree gallery’ if you will. The implementation of the trees, not only provides canvasses, but also highlights that the wondrous art they carry is in their mere existence being such key contributors to our environment.
  2. Another possible aim of this artwork is to further display the multifaceted glory that is nature and how it fuels the inspiration of work that captivates us. It serves as a reminder that it is necessary to transcend a short-term goal-oriented mindset that swirls in us with such strength, but is the very destruction of our environment, which in essence, both biologically and emotionally speaking, is a mothering vessel that cares for us deeply.

Artist Report: Hans Haacke

Gift Horse, Model for Fourth Plinth; 2013; Trafalgar Square, London; Bronze + electroluminescent film
Gift Horse, Model for Fourth Plinth; 2013; Trafalgar Square, London; Bronze + electroluminescent film
Growing Up Together; 2014; NYC; UV matte laminated color inkjet phtoograph mounted on aluminium
Growing Up Together; 2014; NYC; UV matte laminated color inkjet phtoograph mounted on aluminium
The Business Behind Art Knows the Art of the Koch Brothers; 2014; NYC; C-print + overall triptych framed + photo-collaged hundred dollar bills
The Business Behind Art Knows the Art of the Koch Brothers; 2014; NYC; C-print + overall triptych framed + photo-collaged hundred dollar bills
Grass Cube; 1967; NYC; acrylic plastic + earth + fescue grass + water
Grass Cube; 1967; NYC; acrylic plastic + earth + fescue grass + water
Rhinewater Purification Plant; 1972; Krefeld, Germany; contaminated water + purification system + goldfish
Rhinewater Purification Plant; 1972; Krefeld, Germany; contaminated water + purification system + goldfish

Expert Statement:

“A system is not imagined, it is real.”65 Hans Haacke 1967 will make a different real from the systems of air, ice, and water on view; we are more likely to think about the hydrocarbons burning at a distant site to fuel Ice Stick, the global climate implied by Condensation (a.k.a. “Weather”) Cube, or the absurd inefficiencies of Artificial Rain and Transplanted Moss. Clearly, the ephemeral works’ titles were already shifting to emphasize the human agency behind “artificial” climates and “transplanted” biota; the full social turn was not far behind. If we can no longer sustain the earliest belief that the systems of Systems Art are “absolutely independent” of humans, we can still take up Haacke’s initial offer of an artworld space, time, and provocation to contemplate their unfolding.

-Caroline Jones on Hans Haacke 1967 at MIT

Subject Statement:

The Rhinewater Purification Plant entails a large, square glass tank. Adjacent from a large window, smaller rectangular and cylindrical tanks pump water from the the Rhine river, which is filled with the murky discharge of the Krefeld sewage plant, into the large, square glass tank via a small tube. The large, square glass tank is filled with goldfish. A clear tube comes out of the large, square tank into the wood floor. The water pumps through an additional water purification system to water the Museum Haus Lange gardens.

Content Statement:

  1. A possibility for the artwork content is to highlight the effect that the sewage plant’s discharges have on the environment. Despite being treated enough to not pose any instantaneous harm, the discharges still play a role in the degradation of the water quality of the Rhine river.
  2. Another possibility for the artwork content is to raise awareness that our mere existence is our very own detriment. We seldom think to care for what carries us, lost in our journeys that consider every variable but never the backdrop it occurs in. Water is an incredibly crucial component of life, with our livelihood having a direct correlation to its presence and our ability to value it must be fostered in our beings like second nature.

Idiosyncrasy about the artist

He resists having his face photographed due to his firm belief that artists are often subjected to fetishization as personalities.

Down Proclamation Street

Self-love is a necessary entity for one’s existence. Too often, I, as many, have uttered words that are like unswept glass, cutting you when you least expect it. Seldom, do people unanimously and uniformly feel like they are vessels of love that deserve to love and be loved. This is an ongoing journey that we all experience and for several of us it is an uphill battle, when in essence we are honey and honey seldom rots.

Pooling inspiration from Jon Rubin’s ‘The Last Billboard’, an art piece in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania which invites people to write a message on a billboard located on top of a waffle shop, and Miranda July’s + Harrell Fletcher’s website that aims to teach self-love and care ‘Learning to Love You More’ comes ‘Down Proclamation Street’. Taking a street in Camden, NJ, members from the public will be invited to write messages about self-love and healing in moss graffiti.

Expert Statement:

The first question we should ask ourselves when looking at a work of art is: – Does it give me the chance to exist in front of it, or, on the contrary, does it deny me as a subject, refusing the consider the Other in its structure?

-Nicolas Ribbaud

Subject Statement

Down a street spattered with buildings, abandoned and habitable, messages written by various members of the public on their personal experiences and advice about the journey to self-love and healing in moss graffiti. The messages will vary in font style and design due to that being at the liberty of the writer of the message.

Content Statement

  1. The artist aims to create an environment that is charged with the relevance of self-love and healing in an environment that is physically deemed to lack the embodiment of such a feat due to there being a link between socioeconomic status and race to self-image. The project aims to promote a necessary component of one’s mental health to a community that seldom hears it.
  2. The artist aims to create a common ground for various community members who may be fractured due to lack of communication or disjointed lifestyles, who all undoubtedly have experienced or are currently experiencing the rollercoaster that is loving oneself, especially in a time where self-love and self-preservation is considered revolutionary. This further facilitates a forum that promotes the communication of shared experiences and understanding that no one is quite alone.

Artist Report: Martijn Engelbregt

'Get Lost', October 2011, wood + doors
‘Get Lost’, October 2011, wood + doors
'Bouncing Ball Pit', August 2011, Large inflated balls + rods+ mesh
‘Bouncing Ball Pit’, August 2011, Large inflated balls + rods+ mesh
'Have it my Way', 2006., Cahier+ paper+ black block letters
‘Have it my Way’, 2006., Cahier+ paper+ black block letters
Goods Advice, October 2010, Poster + typography
Goods Advice, October 2010, Poster + typography
The Quiet Leftover Restaurant, 2008, invasive plants and edible leftovers + picnic tables+ culinary art
The Quiet Leftover Restaurant, 2008, invasive plants and edible leftovers + picnic tables+ culinary art

Expert Statement:

The first question we should ask ourselves when looking at a work of art is: – Does it give me the chance to exist in front of it, or, on the contrary, does it deny me as a subject, refusing the consider the Other in its structure?

-Nicolas Ribbaud

Subject Statement:

Picnic tables are placed on top of each other in a park in the Netherlands, decreasing in number by row. This creates a pyramid like structure, which also serves as a dining place for the meals cooked with ‘herb hunts’ that the artist and his group, along with a Chef named Miguel Brugman went out and collected weeds and invasive plants as well as leftover foods from wholesalers and market stalls to make meals to serve to the public.

Content Statement:

  1. A possibility for the content of this art project is to highlight the amount of waste that is incurred by the food industry today (in that they yielding 35% wasteful food), despite there being stomachs that go to sleep hungry and mouths in need of the food they easily dispose of.
  2. Another possibility for the art content is that the artist and his team want to highlight how inefficient our self sustaining capability is, as we waste and do not think to use what is around us efficiently.

Camden, the Beautiful: A Public Art Proposal

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Summary

The project aims to publicly proclaim love to a city that is often deemed unlovable and unwanted. Twelve letter love poems will be displayed every ten minutes from local citizens, elucidating and expressing their love and care for the city, projected on the wall of an empty warehouse on North Delaware street.

Expert Statement:

‘Public art can express civic values, enhance the environment, transform a landscape, heighten our awareness, or question our assumptions. Placed in a public site, this art is therefore for everyone, a form of collective community expression — from the once celebrated but now unrecognized general on a horse to the abstract sculpture that may baffle the passer-by on first glance.’ -Penny Balkin Bach, Art administrator and Executive Director of the Association of Public Art

Subject Statement:

On the barren walls of a vacant warehouse with red brick walls and yellow bricked windows, there is a projection of black text in a white background. There is a lamp post to the left of the text and silhouettes of trees on the road. White snow is spattered at the edge of the sidewalk. The text contains twelve words and reads ‘Honey-coated bones- you call me yours, gun barrel mouthed and all.’

Content Statement:

  1. The artist’s intention through this work could be to create twelve word love poems glorifying a city whose name often makes one wrinkle their nose in distaste. The 12 word poems to the city from its inhabitants, aim to publicly proclaim and highlight the home that is Camden and the love, that even in its desolate state, it deserves.
  2. Another possibility for the artwork content is that the artist seeks to create a positive image that fortifies a city whose bones are endlessly doused in negative connotations. Establishing a platform of positive messages, it portrays the relevance of the city to several and the need to preserve and care for it.

Community + Public Art:

‘Camden, the Beautiful’ aims to bring to the community a medium of expression. It yearns to highlight the wondrous moments captured, the comfort folded in its crevices, the laughter echoed in its alleys among other fascinating bits of Camden. This public art idea could have a positive impact on the community in that it recruits the members in the community, promoting a collective environment,  to write a short love poem to their city in hopes to not only uplift the negative image of the city but to remind others that this place too is relevant and a home to several.

Artist Report: Banksy

'I Don't Believe in Global Warming', December 2009, spray paint + wall, Regents Canal, Camden, north London, UK.
‘I Don’t Believe in Global Warming’, December 2009, spray paint + wall, Regents Canal, Camden, north London, UK.
'Mobile Lovers', Bristol, UK, April 2014, spray paint + stencil+ door
‘Mobile Lovers’, Bristol, UK, April 2014, spray paint + stencil+ door
'Clacton-on-sea', Essex, October 2014, Stencil + spray paint+ wall
‘Clacton-on-sea’, Essex, October 2014, Stencil + spray paint+ wall
#3, NYC, October 2013, Stencil+spray paint
#3, NYC, October 2013, Stencil+spray paint
Gaza residency, February 2015, Gaza, Palestine, Stencil + wall
Gaza residency, February 2015, Gaza, Palestine, Stencil + wall

Statement:

“He brings art to the streets in a way that very few artists do. People stop who don’t go into galleries, who don’t go into museums, and they look at Banksy. “

-Will Ellsworth-Jones, former Sunday Times chief correspondent and author of Banksy: The Man Behind the Wall.

Subject vs. Content Statement: Clacton-on-sea

Subject:

In ‘Clacton-on-sea’ the artist Banksy, on a pale yellow wall, stenciled six birds. The birds are standing on a wire. Five of the birds are grey and black pigeons, four of which are facing a colorful bird whilst the fifth pigeon looks away. The pigeons are holding white banners suspended by wooden sticks with slogans that say ‘Migrants not welcome’, ‘Go back to Africa’ and ‘Keep Off Our Worms’ in grey block letters. To the left side of the piece is a migratory swallow bird colored green, blue and black leaning forward with its head turned back towards the five pigeons.

Content:

  1. A possibility for the artwork content of this piece could be that the artist seeks to highlight the unwelcoming nature of the immigration laws and citizens of the United Kingdom, whereby immigrants are often subjected to a second-class citizenship sort of lifestyle by skewed nationalist emphasis that with immigration the genesis of the facilitation of job loss, minimizing of resources and opportunities available to citizens, when in essence what drives people to immigrate is opportunity and that home is similar to the mouth of a gun with war-bitten buildings and what were once laughter-filled verandas embraced by loneliness.
  2. Another possibility is that the artist aims to communicate to the audience that despite being different, the bird is still a bird. Further solidifying the notion that no human being is truly illegal or an ‘alien’, but rather an inhabitant of earth just as those who spew anti-immigration remarks are.

Artist idiosyncracy:

An interesting fact about Banksy is that no one truly knows who Banksy is, the only confirmatory notion about this artist is that he/she is from Bristol, UK.

The Octagonal Planter

Rear view of the Octagonal Planter
Rear view of the Octagonal Planter
Front view of the Octagonal Planter
Front view of the Octagonal Planter
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Inside view of Octagonal Planter

Expert Statement:

“It takes a lot of skill to be able to grow food sustainably. Its an art form. We need to raise agriculture up to another different level like they do in Europe where farmers are on the same level as engineers and doctors… because the food that we eat is the most important thing in our lives.”

– Antonio Roman-Alcala, Farmer/Activist Alemany Farm, San Francisco, CA

Subject Statement:

    In the ‘Octagonal Planter’, the artists created a wooden planter shaped like an octagon. Painted a pale green, the planter has eight faces, of which one face is shorter than the rest, accommodating for the plastic drawer that will will be placed under the planter. The interior of the planter has a base that is drilled with holes, and numerous crotched white wicks made of yarn going through them.

Content Statement:

  1. A possibility of the artwork content is that with Camden being a food desert, the multitude of vegetables and fruits available to residents is scarce. Therefore the artists aimed to create sustainable self-watering planters, using materials you can easily have access to, in urban spaces equipping residents with the ability to grow their own food.
  2. Another possibility of the artwork is the artists aim to bring to life a real-world application to  Le Chatelier’s Principle which states: “When a system at equilibrium is subjected to change in concentration, temperature, volume, or pressure, then the system readjusts itself to (partially) counteract the effect of the applied change and a new equilibrium is established.” This is established through the wicks which are doused in water in the plastic drawer, and via capillary action, pull it through the soil, to provide irrigation to the plants minimizing algal growth on the surface of the soil due to overwatering.